• Karakters2_werelden verbinden

    Werelden verbinden | 国际接轨

  • Karakters_6_ontwikkeling

    Ontwikkelingen | 发展

  • Karakters_4_kennis

    Kennis | 知识

  • Karakters_5_samenwerking

    Samenwerking | 合作

  • Karakters_1_samenwerking

    Samenwerking | 合作

  • Karakters3_uitwisseling

    Uitwisseling | 交流

Schermafdruk 2020 01 13 08.33.23Shortly after 9am the neighbourhood care centre for the elderly shuffles to life. One man belts out a folk song. A centenarian sits by his Chinese chessboard, awaiting an opponent. A virtual-reality machine, which lets users experience such exotic adventures as grocery shopping and taking the subway, sits unused in the corner. A bigger attraction is the morning exercise routine—a couple of dozen people limbering up their creaky joints. They are the leading edge of China’s rapid ageing, a trend that is already starting to constrain its economic potential. Since the care centre opened half a year ago in Changning, in central Shanghai, more than 12,000 elderly people from the area have passed through its doors. The city launched these centres in 2014, combining health clinics, drop-in facilities and old-people’s homes. It plans to have 400 by 2022. “We can’t wait. We’ve got to do everything in our ability to build these now,” says Peng Yanli, a community . . . . read more in The Economist

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