• Karakters_5_samenwerking

    Samenwerking | 合作

  • Karakters_6_ontwikkeling

    Ontwikkelingen | 发展

  • Karakters3_uitwisseling

    Uitwisseling | 交流

  • Karakters_4_kennis

    Kennis | 知识

  • Karakters2_werelden verbinden

    Werelden verbinden | 国际接轨

  • Karakters_1_samenwerking

    Samenwerking | 合作

By 2050, a quarter of China’s population is expected to be age 65 or older. Although the government has recently loosened its restrictive population policy to allow most couples to have two children, so far it doesn’t look likely that any forthcoming baby boom will save China from its rapidly aging population.

China’s current elderly, especially those living in rural areas, frequently endure chronic medical conditions without treatment, according to a new study in the journal International Health. Dai Baozhen of Jiangsu University’s Department of Health Policy & Management analyzed the results of China’s semi-regular “health and nutrition survey” for 2009, looking in particular at the responses from rural households in nine provinces.

Among his findings: China’s elderly are likely to be less educated than younger cohorts and often poorer. Nearly 70 percent of the rural elderly in the survey had an annual income of less than 5,000 renminbi ($810). Many also said their children had left home to work in cities, and while they might send money back, they couldn’t provide steady emotional support or help in obtaining and monitoring health care. Fifty-eight percent of the elderly respondents were illiterate, another barrier in . . . . read more

Zoeken

jan booij
hoogeveen logo
meetin